Robert's FotoPage

By: Robert Romelfanger

[Recommend this Fotopage] | [Share this Fotopage]
[Archive]
Sunday, 30-Sep-2012 04:07 Email | Share | | Bookmark
Colorado State Amendment 64 will instantly legalize cannabis.

If Amendment sixty four passes, it is going to nearly immediately legalize under Colorado
legislation for adults to possess, grow, use and share as
much as an ounce of marijuana. It might take greater than a year,
nevertheless, before adults should buy marijuana legally
in a store.

A poll launched the first weeks of September by Public Coverage
Polling exhibits the statute continues to be ahead, at the moment by a 47-38 margin, with 15 percent still undecided. Passage
may enable the state to increase tax revenues by $50
million a year whereas additionally
doubtlessly decreasing the cost of law enforcement.

If the measure passes, the
elements of the statute related to individual
habits will go into effect as soon as the governor authorizes a
proclamation certifying the results of the election, which he's
obligated to do inside thirty days.

Portionsassociated to the commercialindustrial agriculture and
sale of marijuana would take effect little by little, however
cannabis can be accessible on the market
officially before late 2013 or early 2014.

Even if the state of Colorado strikes forward with
implementing the new lawin a well timed fashion, it is
anyone's guess what the federal response–if there is one–will be. The Federal Goverment could do nothing, might attempt to delay implementation, or might put offuntil legal
businesses are set up and then move to shut them down,
possibly detainingshop owners and staff within the process.

The statute demands the Colorado Department of Income to
adopt rules governing the licensing of commercial companies by no
later than July 1, 2013. According to the
statute these regulations can not prevent marijuana
businesses or make their business "unreasonably impractical."

Lawyer Brian Vicente, co-director of the pro-sixty four political campaign,
says that the amendment was written in such a manner that the
elected representatives can choose to deal with the problem, consequently providing direction to the DOR, or can
do nothing and leave the crafting of rules fully
to DOR staff.

"We left it open so that the legislature could be as lively
as it needs to be or it could actually leave the matter solely to
DOR," Vicente advised the Colorado Independent.

D.o.r.should start processingcommerceapplications by Oct. 1, 2013. If the Department of
revenueneglects to meet the deadline, prospective
small business owners can submit an application for local business licenses,
thus bypassing the state. Local governments must set up their very own
laws, additionally by Oct. 1, 2013. Local governments might
also vetomarijuana companies, however want a vote of the
people to do so.

Even when a city or county prohibits marijuana businesses, residentsof
the neighborhood could still be permitted to cultivate,
have, use give out small quantities of cannabis.

Whereas the statute decriminalizes personal use of
cannabis, open use would remain criminal. Patrons at a
ball game for instance, wouldn't be permitted go to the smoking space and smoke a joint. Folks wouldn't be permitted on a park bench and lightland spark and smoke a marijuana pipe.
Individuals growing their very own could have as much as six
plants, with not more than three being mature at any given time. Vegetation must be grown in secured areas that are not seen by the public. Even when it exceeds
the authorized one ounce, growers could be permitted to own their
total harvest.

Employers would not have to accommodate people who wish to use at
their joband would still be allowed to test for use of
marijuana and replace people who test positive. Drivingunder the influence of marijuana would remain unlawful and it would remain unlawful to sell or share marijuana to
anyone younger than 21.

Vicente explains "employers will continue to have the potential to
keep any policies they have about
marijuana use. As soon as it is legal, it's our desire that they'll welcome sensible guidelines
relating to the authorized use of a legal product on individuals's
personal time."

Economic impression

The Blue Book, fashioned by the Colorado Legislative Council, estimates the
financial influence that may very
well be anticipated if the law passes. The book
says that sales taxes and licensing charges can be
anticipated to be about $5 million and $22 million per year and that
the associated fee to the state would be $1.three million within
the first 12 months and|around$700,000 a yr subsequently. The book makes no estimatesof community
earningsor expenses.

The law, although, additionally needsthe legislature to
endorsean excise tax of up to 15 percent through 2017 and at any
fee agreed to by the legislature after2017. This tax would be collected
on gross sales from growers to retailers and cannabisproduct
manufacturingcompanies. The Blue Book }
approximationof just how much such a tax
may generate. The tax must be placed by
the legislature and then voted on byColorado residents.

"It's our firm belief that the elected
representatives will move such a tax as quickly as they can," Vicente
said. He and the marketing campaign estimatethat the
income from such a tax might be up to $24
million to $seventy three million ayear. The amendment stipulates that first $forty
million a year createdby the tax will go toward a state fund for the development of public schools.

More at go!!

Laura Chapin, spokesperson for the anti-64 marketing campaign, mentioned she
doesn't believe the state would ever see anywhere near the sum of money estimated by proponents. "How do you tax an
trade that cannot usebank accounts?," she
inquired, stating that federallegislation
prohibitsbanksfrom takingdeposits of money
madeby selling a substance that can remain unlawful under
federallaw.

Vicente, though, states several medical cannabis
companies within the state already do have bank accounts. He
notesthat there was lots of media
attentionregardingbanks turning awaybusiness with cannabisdispensaries, but said quite a few banks and
dispensaries are "quietly doing business mutually."

Aaron Smith, government director of the Nationwide Hashish Trade
Affiliation, mentioned Chapin's argumentis
"ridiculous."

"Many cannabiscompanies do holdbank accounts, however I
guarantee you that even those that don't, pay their taxes," he said. "That is
simply an absurdstatement. They clearlydidn't
do their research," Smith stated.

Research released in Augby the Colorado Center on Legislation and Policy
approximatesthat local governments mightgeneratea collective$14 million
ayr within the beginning. That research also
estimatesfinancial savings in police costs of $12 million peryear
immediately, growing to $40 million annually in
successiveyears.

Whereas it does not linkdirectly to Amendment sixty four, the
Nationwide Hashish Trade Association launched a
study on Sept. thirteen that reveals tax income in Coloradobecause of medicinalmarijuana
seemingly was more than$10 million in 2011. The research, whichlooked at solely ten Colorado cities, shows that
medicinalmarijuana companies within the cities studied,
made$5.1 million in localtax revenues and practically $4.5
million in state tax revenues. Business license charges bring in
millions more, the research
claims. In Denver alone, revenue from such fees
was more than$6 million just in 2011, in accordance the
research.


Friday, 28-Sep-2012 03:58 Email | Share | | Bookmark
Colorado Statute 64 will instantly authorize pot.

If Statute 64 passes, it should nearly immediately authorize Colorado
law for adults to possess, cultivate, use and give up to an oz. of marijuana. It may take greater than a yr,
nevertheless, before adults can buy marijuana in a store legally.

A poll launched at the beginning of September by Public Coverage
Polling shows the amendment continues to lead, presently by a 47-38 margin, with 15 p.c still undecided. Passage
might enable the state to extend taxable revenues by over $50 mil per year while additionally
doubtlessly decreasing the amount spent on enforcing the law.

If the new law passes, the
components of the statute associated to individual
habits will go into motion as soon as the governor authorizes a
proclamation certifying the outcomes of the election, which he's
expected to do inside thirty days.

Sectionsrelated to the commercialindustrial agriculture and
selling of marijuana would take effect little by little, but
cannabis can be accessible for sale
lawfully ahead of late 2013 or early 2014.

Even when the state of Colorado strikes forward with
implementing the new regulationin a timely fashion, it's
anybody's guess what the national response–if there is one–will be. The Federal govt may do nothing, might attempt to stall implementation, or might delayuntil legal
companies are arranged and then move to shut them down,
possibly arrestingshop keepers and employees in
the process.

The statute necessitates the Colorado Department of Income to
adopt rules governing the licensing of commercial companies by no
later than July 1, 2013. In line with the
law these laws can not prevent marijuana
companies or render their business "unreasonably impractical."

Attorney Brian Vicente, co-director of the pro-64 political campaign,
says that the law was written in such a way that the
legislature can select to address the problem, thus offering direction to the DOR, or can
do nothing and leave the crafting of regulations completely
to DOR staff.

"We left it open so that the legislature will be as lively
as it wants to be or it may possibly leave the matter totally to
DOR," Vicente informed the Colorado Independent.

Department of revenueshould begin handing
outproductionapplications by Oct. 1, 2013. If the DORfails to satisfy the deadline, prospective
company owners can submit an application for local business licenses,
thus bypassing the state. Local governments must set up their very own
regulations, also by Oct. 1, 2013. Local governments might
also banmarijuana companies, but need a vote of the
people to do so.

Even if a town or county prohibits marijuana companies, residentsof
the neighborhood wouldnonetheless be allowed to cultivate,
have, consume and give small amounts of marijuana.

While the statute decriminalizes personal use of
cannabis, open use would remain illegal. Patrons at a
football game as an example, would not be
allowed go to the smoking space and light a joint. Folks would
not be allowed to sit on a park bench and lightland spark and smoke a marijuana pipe.
Individuals growing their very own might have as much as six
plants, with no more than three being mature at any given time. Crops would have
to be grown in secured areas that are not visible to the public. Even if it exceeds
the authorized one ounce, growers could be permitted to own their
total harvest.

Employers would not need to accommodate people who want to smokeat
workand would nonetheless be permitted to test for use of
marijuana and to fire people who pop positive. Drivingunder the influence of marijuana would remain unlawful and it
will stay unlawful to sell or give marijuana to
anyone under the age of 21.

Vicente explains "employers will continue to have the ability to
preserve any work policies they already have about
marijuana use. As soon as it is legal, it's our wish that they are going to welcome sensible guidelines
concerning the legal use of a authorized product on individuals's
own time."

Economic influence

The Blue Book, created by the Colorado Legislative Council, approximates the
monetary impact that could be expected if the statute passes. THe Blue Book
says that sales taxes and licensing charges could be
expected to be approximately $5 million and $22 million per year and that
the price to the state could be $1.3 million within
the first 12 months and|about$700,000 a yr there
after. The book makes no approximationsof local
earningsor costs.

The amendment, although, additionally requiresthe legislature to
ratifyan excise tax of up to 15 p.c by 2017 and at any
price agreed to by the legislature after2017. This tax would be collected
on gross sales from growers to retailers and cannabisproduct
developingbusinesses. The Blue Book }
estimateof how much such a tax
might generate. The tax would have to be established by
the legislature and then voted on byresidents of Colorado.

"It's our dedicated belief that the legislature will move a tax such as this as quickly as they can," Vicente
said. He and the marketing campaign approximatethat the
income from such a tax might be up to $24
million to $seventy three million ayear. The modification stipulates that initial $40
million a yr createdby the tax will go toward a state fund for the
construction of public schools.

More @ More Information

Laura Chapin, spokesperson for the anti-64 marketing campaign, mentioned she
doesn't believe the state would ever see anywhere close to the sum of money debated by proponents. "How do you tax an
business that cannot usefinancial institution accounts?," she
inquired, stating that nationallaw
preventsbanksfrom acceptingdeposits of money
aquiredby selling a substance that can stay illegal under
nationalregulation.

Vicente, though, says a few medicinal marijuana
businesses within the state already do have bank accounts. He
notesthat there has been plenty of media
attentionregardingbanks turning
downbusiness with marijuanadispensaries, however stated numerous banks and
dispensaries are "quietly doing business jointly."

Aaron Smith, government director of the National Hashish Industry
Association, said Chapin's disputeis
"absurd."

"Many cannabiscompanies do holdbank accounts, but I
guarantee you that even those who don't, pay their taxes," he said. "That's
merely an incredulousstatement. They evidentlydidn't
do their homework," Smith said.

Research released in Augustby the Colorado Center on Legislation and Coverage
estimatesthat local governments could makea collective$14 million
ayr in the beginning. That study also
estimatessavings in police costs of $12 million ayear
immediately, rising to $40 million per yr in
lateryears.

Whereas it doesn'tlinkon to Amendment sixty four, the
Nationwide Cannabis Industry Association launched a
examine on Sept. thirteen that reveals tax income in The state of
coloradoas a result of medicalmarijuana
possible was more than$10 million in 2011. The study, that
checked out solely ten Colorado cities, shows that
medicalmarijuana businesses within the cities studied,
generated$5.1 million in communitytax revenues and nearly $4.5
million in state tax earnings. Enterprise license fees usher in
thousands and thousands more, the study
indicates. In Denver alone, income from such charges
was more than$6 million just in 2011, based on the
study.


Wednesday, 26-Sep-2012 05:23 Email | Share | | Bookmark
Colorado Statute 64 will immediately legalize pot.

If Statute 64 goes through, it
can almost instantly legalize underneath Colorado
legislation for adults to own, grow, use and give as
much as an ounce of marijuana. It might take greater than a year,
nonetheless, first adults should purchase marijuana in a store legally.

A ballot released at the beginning of September by Public Policy
Polling reveals the amendment continues to be ahead, at the moment by a forty seven-38 margin, with 15 % still undecided. Passage
may allow the state of Colorado to extend tax revenues by $50
million a year whereas also
doubtlessly decreasing the amount spent on enforcing the law.

If the new law passes, the
parts of the law related to select
habits go into effect as quickly as the governor signs a
proclamation certifying the outcomes of the election, which he is
obligated to do within 30 days.

Portionsrelated to the commercialindustrial agriculture and
sale of cannabis would take hold incrementally, but
cannabis could be available on the market
officially earlier than late 2013 or early 2014.

Even if the state of Colorado moves ahead with
implementing the new lawin a timely fashion, it is
anybody's best guess what the federal reaction–if there is one–will be. The
feds might do nothing, might move to block implementation, or might waittill authorized
businesses are arranged after which move to shut them down,
probably arrestingowners and employees within the process.

The law necessitates the Colorado Department of Revenue to
adopt regulations governing the licensing of economic companies by no
later than July 1, 2013. In response to the
law these rules can not prevent cannabis
businesses or render their operation "unreasonably impractical."

Lawyer Brian Vicente, co-director of the pro-64 campaign,
states that the amendment was written in such a manner that the
government can select to handle the problem, thus providing guidance to the DOR, or can
do nothing and leave the crafting of regulations fully
to DOR staff.

"We left it open in order that the legislature may be as energetic
as it desires to be or it
will probably leave the matter completely to
DOR," Vicente informed the Colorado Independent.

D.o.r.should start giving outindustryapplications by Oct. 1, 2013. If the Department of
revenuefails to satisfy the deadline, potential
company owners can apply for local business licenses,
thus bypassing the state. Local governments should establish their very own
rules, also by Oct. 1, 2013. Local governments may also barmarijuana companies, but need a vote of the
individuals to do so.

Even if a town or county bans cannabis businesses, residentsof
the area wouldstill be allowed to grow,
have, use give away small amounts of marijuana.

Whereas the amendment decriminalizes private use of
cannabis, unrestricted use would stay illegal. Patrons at a
ball game for instance, wouldn't be able to go to the smoking space and light a joint. Folks would
not be allowed on a park bench and lightland spark and smoke a marijuana pipe.
People growing their own might have as much as six
plants, with no more than three being mature at any given time. Plants must be grown in secured areas that aren't seen by the public. Even if it exceeds
the authorized one ounce, growers could be allowed to possess their
total harvest.

Employers wouldn't have to accommodate individuals who wish to use at
workand would nonetheless be permitted to test for marijuana use and replace individuals who pop positive. Drivingunder the influence of marijuana would remain unlawful and it might stay unlawful to sell or share pot to
anybody under the age of 21.

Vicente explains "employers will continue to have the potential to
preserve any work policies they have about
marijuana use. Once it's legal, it's our desire that they
will welcome common sense rules
regarding the legal use of a authorized product on folks's
own time."

Financial influence

The Blue Book, produced by the Colorado Legislative Council, approximates the
economic affect that may very
well be anticipated if the amendment passes. The book
states that sales taxes and licensing fees can be
anticipated to be approximately $5 million and $22 million per year and that
the associated fee to the state could be $1.3 million within
the first 12 months and|approximately$700,000 a yr there
after. The book makes no estimatesof community
earningsor costs.

The statute, although, additionally needsthe legislature to
ratifyan excise tax of as much as 15 p.c through 2017 and at any
rate agreed to by the legislature after2017. This tax can be collected
on gross sales from retailers to grower and cannabisproduct
developingorganizations. The Blue Book }
estimationof the level such a tax
might make. The tax would have to be arranged by
the legislature and then voted on byresidents of Colorado.

"It's our dedicated view that the elected
representatives will move a tax such as this as soon as they'll," Vicente
said. He and the campaign approximationthat the
income from such a tax may very well be approximately $24
million to $seventy three million ayear. The amendment stipulates that initial $40
million a yr producedby the tax will be moved to a state fund for the
construction of public schools.

Additional at high times reviews

Laura Chapin, spokesperson for the anti-sixty four marketing campaign, stated she
doesn't think the state would ever see anywhere near the amount of cash debated by proponents. "How do you tax an
trade that can't utilizefinancial institution accounts?," she
asked, mentioning that nationallegislation
prohibitsfinancial institutionsfrom acceptingdeposits of cash
aquiredby selling a substance that may remain unlawful under
nationalregulation.

Vicente, although, claims a few medical cannabis
companies in the state already do have financial institution accounts. He
notesthat there was lots of pressregardingbanks refusing to dobusiness with cannabisdispensaries, but stated quite a few banks and
dispensaries are "quietly doing business together."

Aaron Smith, executive director of the National Hashish Trade
Affiliation, mentioned Chapin's argumentis
"incredulous."

"Many cannabisbusinesses do retainfinancial institution accounts, but I
guarantee you that even those that don't, pay their taxes," he said. "That is
simply an unbelievablestatement. They obviouslydidn't
do their homework," Smith stated.

Research released in Augustby the Colorado Center on Regulation and Coverage
estimatesthat local governments could makea collective$14 million
ayear within the beginning. That research additionally
approximatessavings in police costs of $12 million peryear
instantly, growing to $40 million per yr in
lateryears.

While it does not correlatedirectly to Amendment 64, the
Nationwide Cannabis Business Association released a
examine on Sept. 13 that reveals tax revenue in Coloradoas a result of prescriptionmarijuana
doubtless was more than$10 million in 2011. The research, that
looked at solely ten Colorado cities, shows that
medicalmarijuana companies in the cities studied,
generated$5.1 million in communitytax revenues and practically $4.5
million in state tax earnings. Enterprise license fees usher in
millions extra, the research
says. Just in Denver, revenue from such charges
was more than$6 million in 2011, in accordance the
study.


[Archive]

© Pidgin Technologies Ltd. 2016

ns4008464.ip-198-27-69.net